Posts Tagged 'Transformational Christianity'

Is the Holy Ghost the Second Coming?

Gian Lorenzo Bernini, Dove of the Holy Spirit, ca. 1660. Stained glass. Throne of St Peter, St Peters Basilica Vatican.Wikicommons

Holy Spirit as a Dove (detail) Gian Lorenzo Bernini, Dove of the Holy Spirit, ca. 1660. Stained glass. Throne of St Peter, St Peters Basilica Vatican (Wikicommons)

While discussing bishop John Shelby Spong’s book, “The Fourth Gospel:  Tales of a Jewish Mystic” (which I enthusiastically recommend reading) the question arose as to whether we might understand the Holy Ghost as the Second Coming?  I think the answer depends upon how one understands the terms, and the ideas toward which the terms point.

Chapter 19 of Spong’s “The Fourth Gospel” relates the allegories of the “vine” to an understanding of God as an in-dwelling Spirit;  this is specifically in opposition to thinking of God as external to us.  Spong is speaking of the in-dwelling Spirit of God as comprising part of who we are as self-conscious human beings.

  • It is not that God is absent in animals, and even rocks.
  • But we do differ from rocks and even birds and cats and dogs, in that we have a very strong sense of self-awareness and self-consciousness.  This is why we struggle against the idea of death.  Dogs and cats and cattle may struggle against death itself, but they do not sit around worrying about the eventually.  We do;  because we are self-consciousness.  We know that we exist, and we know that we will cease to exist.  The effort to transcend this eventuality is the reason many of us search for God.

Pantheism

Pantheism basically means “God Everywhere.”  God is understood as being everywhere in the cosmos: in every rock, every tree, every stream, every bird, every dog and cat, and in every person. This is one of the ways animalism and many aboriginal religions are interpreted by persons living in the West, although typically with the arrogant caveat such a “primitive” notion must be mistaken.

Small Pantheism

The “small” way of viewing pantheism is as lots of little spirits dwelling within everything: wood sprites, water spirits, etc.  Every culture of which I am aware, from the dawn of history, developed such a view.  Greco-Roman paganism was similarly structured, ranging from the “Big Gods” on Mount Olympia to city gods, to family gods, to gods of brooks, streams, woods, etc.  There were gods everywhere, and they were vested in every part of leading one’s life.

Most forms of Christianity, I suggest, see this as a form of multiple (“false”) gods.  But there is an important point to add here, which I find adds perspective.  Christians tend to be concerned about their afterlife:  Heaven or Hell, as the saying goes.  Pagans were not especially interested in this.  Most of them assumed death brought our annihilation.  What did matter for them was this life and getting enough to eat, having enough water to drink and raise crops, remaining healthy, and related basic needs of our survival.

Also, death was ever-present in a way I feel we fail to appreciate.  Where we get an abscessed tooth, and go to the dentist, they usually died!  The world was very different 2,000-years ago, and this is a significant point we tend to forget or fully appreciate;  many of us (most?) certainly fail to feel that kind of reality in our own day-to-day lives.  So I suspect we tend to ridicule “pagans” and those who hold aboriginal beliefs largely out of our own ignorance.

Big Pantheism

The “big” way of viewing pantheism, starts by asking a very different question:

  • Where is God not found in nature?

This requires some thought regarding the nature of God.  Is God only a personality?  Or is God the vital force of life itself?  Does God have a face and lungs, or is God the very essence of life?  Stated poetically, we ask if God is the Breath of Life?  Stated more abstractly, the 20th century theologian Paul Tillich suggested that we consider God as our Ground of Being.

If God is the essence of Life, then we have to find some way of imagining God within everything:  rocks, dust, bugs, deer, sharks, cattle, dogs, cats, and ourselves.  I would suggest this way of seeing God is very close to the truth;  and would result, if taken seriously, in better treatment of all the creatures and resources of this world; as well as one another.

An alternate view, is seeing God as a Big Person Above the Sky.  Useful in terms of language and metaphor, to be sure.  But if we take this too literally, how does this significantly differ from Zeus-Jupiter?

Panentheism (note the –en-)

The late Prof. Ron Miller of blessed memory, suggested it is instructive to think of God as panentheistic.  Pan*EN*theism (adding the “en” between pan- and -theism) argues God is everywhere, both within the cosmos, and outside the cosmos.  The key point of this idea is that God is not limited to the confines of this universe (cosmos).

Of course, we cannot really wrap our minds around what this means.  Our language cannot adequately describe what this implies.  We are creatures of time and of space.  And our language reflects, and is limited by, our nature as beings of time-space.  How does one envision a Being which is not constrained by the very limits of the universe itself?  This is a really, really BIG God!

I believe this way of thinking about God has to be tied to Paul Tillich’s “Ground of Being” idea.  For me, this represents God as the very vitality of life itself.  As advanced as our medical science is today, we do not understand the *essence which creates life.  We, for example, know that brain trauma may become debilitating, but we also know the brain sometimes compensates by building new neural pathways.

And doctors have not found our spirit, or even our consciousness, inside the brain.  Some disagree, and equate behavior changes as the result of brain trauma as proof of our seat of consciousness residing within the brain.  I disagree.  I think this only demonstrates that the “radio” has been damaged, and no longer receives the “radio waves” properly.

In this analogy the brain is the radio, and the radio waves represent our spirit, our consciousness.  And I submit that our consciousness, or spirit, is our seat of being.  But from what does our spirit, or being, emanate?  Tillich suggests this flows from the Ground of Being:  God.

  • In this way of seeing God, God is the fabric, the very essence, of the universe;  God is what holds the subatomic particles together;  God is space-time, onto/into which everything else resides. God is all that, as well as that which is beyond the knowable universe.

If one believes this is likely to be true, then “God” is best understood as panentheistic.  And even though we cannot completely wrap our heads around this, we can sense this is a very, very BIG idea of what must comprise the very nature of the “Beingness” (ontology) of God.

Now, as Christians, we have to figure out what to do with Jesus and the Holy Spirit.

  • In the early days of the Jewish-Christian “Jesus Movement” there was only One God.
  • Not three Gods.
  • And not God-three-is-one, as the doctrine of the Trinity came to propose in the 4th century.

Some early Christians believed Jesus was entirely human and unable to be God.  Others thought Jesus was God and unable to really be human (he just appeared so).  Others thought Jesus was a divine being of the highest order (above angels for example) but a creature created by the Uncreated God (this view presupposes there are only two categories of existence:  the Uncreated;  and that which is created:  “creatures”).

All of these ideas were early Christian teachings.  And they all had sacred books, thus proving their point!

  • Why books are so important to the Christian traditions is an interesting question.  In part, it is because Christianity evolved from Judaism, and the earliest Christians needed to be thought of as already “ancient” and therefore just another way of understanding the very ancient Jewish religion.  In part, it is because completely unlike pagan religions, Christianity is very concerned with what a person believes; pagans, in contrast did not care what a person believed, only in what actions they took – namely, offering the proper sacrifices and prayers to the gods, so as to sustain our life in the here and now.

All of these ways of “properly” understanding what it meant to be a Christian were being debated in the first 300 years after the execution of Jesus.  In the orthodox Christian tradition, these matters came to be codified in the Council of Nicene, convened in 325 ce.  It is from this council that we inherit the Nicene Creed.  While this council did not settle the debates entirely, they did resolve the larger issues, and framed the limits of theological debate to the present day.

But they lived in a three-tiered universe:  Heaven Above;  Earth; and Land of the Dead Below.  We no longer live in that three-tiered universe/cosmos. Therefore, we have to re-think their basic arguments and assumptions, if we wish to carefully think through questions such as the nature of the Second Coming and the Holy Spirit.  And we really have to re-think these kinds of questions if we are going to try to understand the Gospel of John on its own (mystical!) merits.

I find I agree with bishop Spong’s proposition:  the Gospel of John was written by Jewish-Christian mystics.  These authors were not speaking of God as residing Above the Heavens.  They were speaking of an In-Dwelling God, an understanding of God as dwelling within each of us.  This is a very different understanding of God, even today, nearly 2,000-years later!

And to be fair, this is a mystical way of thinking about the Divine, which makes it slippery to grasp.  It is difficult, not easy, to understand.  Anyone can understand a God Above the Heavens who gets angry and destroys cities and people, or rewards individuals or nations for “obeying” whatever it is one presupposes “God wants from us.”

  • The details of “what God wants from us” change, from one tradition to the next -even within Christianity, let alone across religions- but the core idea that God wants something from us, which we supply by modifying our behavior. But this is not a mystical understanding of God. A mystical understanding of God experiences God as in-dwelling! (In-dwelling in all persons; thus, one adopts Unity Consciousness.)

But what if “God” is within each of us and “wants” us to live in such a manner as to expand life for ourselves and everyone around us?  What if God is the very expansion of the universe and the force of life that constantly seeks expression?  What if this self-expression of the essence of God is vitally present in self-conscious beings, such as human beings?

  • God is present in everything, but we are aware of this in-dwelling Presence!

This is a very different understanding of “God” and for many it doesn’t seem easy to grasp.

What about the Trinity?

I am not a strong trinitarian.  In the many hundreds of years since formulating the conceptualization of God as the Trinity of Father-Son-Spirit, no one has nailed this down!  The best theologians of the last 1,700-years or so have always said the heart of this is a “mystery.”  In other words, no one understands it!

We can formulate it pretty clearly.  But this is not at all the same thing as understanding it!  Professor Phillip Cary offers the following technical formation:

1. The Father is God.
2. The Son is God.
3. The Holy Spirit is God.
4. The Father is not the Son.
5. The Son is not the Holy Spirit.
6. The Holy Spirit is not the Father.
7. There is only one God.

We can see how strange this is if we say much the same thing from the classical Greco-Roman perspective:

1. Zeus is God.
2. Apollo is God.
3. Poseidon is God.
4. Zeus is not Apollo.
5. Apollo is not Poseidon.
6. Poseidon is not Zeus.
7. There are three Gods.

Here we have the same formulation, one from a Christian perspective, and one from the Greco-Roman perspective.  They are identical in the logic of the first six steps.  However, the final conclusions are in direct opposition to one another!  This illustrates why Christianity was so perplexing to pagans 2,000-years ago.  And it demonstrates “why the doctrine of the Trinity is so difficult, interesting and strange” (Cary: “The Logic of Trinitarian Doctrine”).

Some have said, when speaking of the Trinity, we forget how to count:  God is above/before numbers.  Others say that God is three Persons (I prefer to say, Personae) but with a single Will.  But no matter how we try to explain the idea of the Trinity, it seems strange and remains beyond our grasp.  And so it has for some 1,700-years, for even the best and brightest theologians over the centuries.  So if this does not really make perfect sense to you, you are in good company!

  • If, and when, one finds speaking of God-as-Trinity useful, I say go for it!  Where it is not useful, I suggest, speaking in different terms.

Active Agent of God

When I speak of the Holy Spirit (or Holy Ghost, which is the transliteration we get from German scholarship on the Holy Spirit/Geist) I mean the active Spirit of the Divine, of which we are aware, and with which we seek to interact.  Our Christian history has offered this idea to us as the Holy Spirit, so I frequently use the same name-title.

  • “Holy Spirit” and “Holy Ghost” are two different names for the same thing:  Holy Spirit is translated from the Latin, Spiritus Sanctus;  from German as, heiligen Geist;  both of which are translated from the original Greek, άγιο πνεύμα, which is roughly “agio pneuma“.

From this perspective the “Holy Spirit” is what I sometimes call the “Active Agent” of God in the world.  I think of this as the aspect of the Divine with which we have interaction.  If one is able to go along with this interpretation, then I think we are getting close to being able to see the Holy Spirit as the Second Coming.  But we still have some more ideas to explore.

Transformational Christianity

I view both the Holy Spirit and the Second Coming as related to Transformational Christianity.  By this I mean the emphasis to first transform ourselves, and through and as a result of our personal changes -a transformation in our thinking, speech, and behaviour- to transform the community in which we live.  I believe this is how we observe the Holy Spirit as being active in our lives, and in our community.

  • As we think, speak, and act better toward one another, I propose calling this change in our personal formulation, the Holy Spirit as active in our lives. Some have also called this Putting on the Mind of Christ.

In this view, we understand the primary function of the Holy Spirit as that which transforms these elements (thinking, speech, and behaviour) in us, and through us, into our wider community.  Thus, the Holy Spirit is that aspect of the Divine which initiates significant changes in our lives;  It is the aspect of the Trinity with which we interact in this physical world.

But what of Jesus?  What about the Christ?

This is a closely related, but somewhat different question.  Here we must address the question of Christology, which is the effort to understand and make sense of the role of Jesus and the Christ, both in the early Jewish-Christian church, and in our own day and age.  This is a very deep subject, asking the very nature of Jesus the Christ!  Entire books have been written on this topic, and there is yet more to say.  This is obviously not a question which may be adequately addressed in one essay.

Christ is the Greek word for messiah, which in Hebrew is mashiach.  It means “anointed” or “the one anointed” and was a ritual anointing which identified the king of Israel as chosen of God, or as the son of God.  When the Babylonians wiped out the line of David, this began to symbolize something more than the kingship;  the idea of the messiah began to be associated with ideas of freedom and liberation from foreign powers.  God’s messiah would come in glory and overthrow the foreign rulers, and put the son of King David back on the throne.

In the Jewish understanding, the messiah was never thought to be a person executed by the state!  This is perhaps the single largest barrier to Jews coming to understand Jesus as the messiah.  He simply could not be, because far from overthrowing the Romans, he was crushed by them!  (Gentiles did not hold this presupposition, so it was easier for a gentile to see Jesus as the messiah, than for a Jew to come to the same understanding.)

  • In the synoptic gospels ―Mark, Matthew, and Luke― we find Jesus hesitant to speak of himself as the messiah.  I think this is because Jesus did not embrace the popular understanding of what this meant to his fellow Jews:  one coming in power to overthrown the Romans.  This concern is not shared in the Gospel of John, however.  But we also cannot read the Gospel of John as remotely literal.  To do so, is to miss the point entirely!

What I think I may say about Jesus and the Christ, in just a few words, is that the way in which Jesus is interpreted in the Gospel of John, expressed as a work of Jewish-Christian mysticism, is that Jesus is the embodiment of the Life of God flowing into the world.  Jesus as the way, the truth, and the life, does not mean we “believe Jesus is God.”  And it is certainly not saying that Jesus has to be killed to save us!

Instead, we are asked to believe that Jesus lived his life in such a way as to promote the in-flowing of the Divine Spirit of God in him, and through him, into the world.  But more than this ―and more importantly I believe― is the proposition that you and I may do the same thing!  (“Even greater things shall you do,” Jesus is made to say in the Gospel of John.)

This is the core meaning of Jesus as understood in the Gospel of John.  Jesus lived a life which brought the vitality of God’s Spirit into this world, and we may do the same thing.  God is not “out there” somewhere, but rather God is “in here” ― dwelling within us.

  • The way to get more God into the world, is to allow more God to flow within us, and through us, into the world:  exactly as it did in, and through, Jesus.

And that ―I believe― is what the mystical Gospel of John is trying to relate to us as the Second Coming.

So, may we think of the Holy Spirit as the Second Coming?

Yes, I think we may.  In the same way, the Kingdom (or Realm) of God is always at hand.  But we are required to participate in bringing it into existence.

God is not going to just drop the Kingdom of Heaven upon us, crushing the wicked and rewarding the good.  That was the thought behind apocalypticism, which was very popular in the time of Jesus (both roughly 100-years before and after his execution).  This was the idea that God would come in glory, displace the evil (Romans) and install the City of God in his Heavenly Realm on Earth.  And all would be ruled in peace for 1,000 years.

But that did not happen.  2,000-years have passed, and despite that some argue “soon” means aeons may pass, that is clearly not what the people of Jesus’ time meant.  They meant really soon, as in their own lifetimes soon.  If we choose to read “soon” to mean thousands and thousands of years later, we are not reading the books as they were written to be understood in their own day and age.

And the writers of the mystical Gospel of John were aware of this!  Nearly 70-years had already passed, and a lot of people had given up on the apocalyptic understanding of “soon.”  So they searched for a new interpretation, one they viewed as replacing what they now understood to have been a mistaken interpretation.

And this leads to the mystical understanding of Jesus’ life and the way God seemed to be expressed in the life of Jesus.  This is why we get the “I am” saying, which very clearly means Jesus is God the Father.  But so too, as Jesus is in God, we are in Jesus, and Jesus is in us.  We all are able to embody God the Father!  This is the very radical change that John is bringing to our understanding, not only of Jesus, but of God the Father;  meaning the Uncreated, which brought all that is, into being;  that same vital essence is available to us, and may flow within us, and through us, and through us into the world!

John is a wonderful gospel! Wonder-filled Good News!  From within the Christian New Testament, it offers the most transformative way of understanding Jesus and God.

  • Yes, we may think of the Holy Spirit as the in-dwelling transformative Breath of Life, which brings about the Second Coming, and creates the Realm of Heaven on earth.  But our participation in this transformative experience is required!

May the Lord bless and keep you!
Erik+

References:

“The Fourth Gospel: Tales of a Jewish Mystic” (HarperCollins Publishers, 2013) John Shelby Spong.

Logic of Trinitarian Doctrine  http://www.scribd.com/doc/2385278/The-Logic-of-Trinitarian-Doctrine-by-Phillip-Cary

Salesian Method of Meditation

Francis de Sales (1567―1622)

Francis de Sales (1567―1622)

Salesian Method of Meditation

Prayer vs. Meditation vs. Contemplation

Prayer, meditation, and contemplation may be defined many ways. In part the definition chosen depends upon who is rendering it, and to what end. For the purposes of this essay, below I offer a working definition of these terms, allowing us to open a discussion concerning Salesian meditation.

There are many kinds of prayer, including: liturgic prayers one chants or says in unison with others during a period of worship; ritual or formal public prayers recited before a meal or meeting or event; sets of formal prayers one may chant or read privately or in a small group; and prayers one might say privately.

One of the shared characteristics of each of the above forms of prayer is they are linguistic in nature: these prayers are composed of words stated or read, aloud or silently. They may be composed contemporaneously (off-the-cuff; unplanned) or formally. They may be private or they may serve a ritual or liturgical function. But they are all linguistic constructs: words.

Sidebar: Words are symbolic constructs, serving as pointers to that which they describe: they are not the object being described. As obvious as this sounds, we frequently forget this in our daily dealings with one another through language. There is always some distance between our interior, subjective world and everything/everyone else. That which connects our interior world to the perceived exterior world is rendered to us both neuro-linguistically and psychologically; and I would argue energetically and spiritually as well. One reason persons may engage in prayer, meditation, and contemplation is to short-circuit this interior/exterior mode of perception, in an attempt to enter direct interior perception ―apperception [1], is more accurate― of the sacred More.

Prayer may be directed outward (a shared public event) or be directed inward (a private event). Meditation on the other hand is an inward directed event.

As an exception to this one might cite guided meditation, in which one person leads others through a meditation. But even in such cases the goal is frequently to train the individuals comprising the group how to conduct their own private meditations at a later date, or to facilitate a meditative technique from which they might continue to benefit in private. Thus, one may argue this is a primarily a means of teaching meditation, not meditation itself.

Furthermore, prayer and meditation are similar to one another in that they each behold an object of attention: that upon which one is focusing. In prayer this is typically a linguistic event. Meditation too may be a linguistic event (repeatedly chanting a verse or mantra), but it may also be a visual (watching a flame, staring into a mandala, or imagining a symbol, such as the Sacred Heart) or sensory event (awareness of one’s breath), or an emotional event (feeling peacefulness or love), or any other event one may imagine.

When meditating, we are focusing our attention upon something, be that a word, a phrase, an image, a scene, another sensory-based experience, or an emotion. The intent is to focus our attention on this object, at the exclusion of all other objects of sensory or cognitive input competing for our attention. This is a kataphatic process ―a state of fullness― an imaginal process in which we are actively engaging and populating our attention.

Contemplation on the other hand is an apophatic state in which we seek emptiness, or the cessation of cognition and awareness. Achieving emptiness is challenging, to say the least. There always seems to be some aspect of the mind which must chatter! Buddhist mediators I’ve read often refer to this as the monkey mind.

Mystics and other contemplatives indicate there is little an individual may do to intentionally bring about an apophatic ―empty― state upon command. Their best counsel is to prepare oneself for the occasion of achieving emptiness, usually through periods of prayer and/or meditation, which are frequently seen as precursors, or means of training, for encountering a contemplative event.

In describing contemplation, I use words such as “event” and “occasion” deliberately. My intention is to suggest the cultivation of a contemplative state yields a rare fruit, short in duration. Often the very onset of the event may itself be sufficient to bring about its conclusion. Such has been my own experience at any rate, and it is one frequently attested to in writings of mystics. One author said he looks for these brief moments of emptiness in the gaps between his train of thoughts; in those brief silences between the near-constant chattering of the monkey mind.

With the foregoing in mind, we will recognize that the Salesian method of meditation is part prayer and part meditation. It will also be self-evident that Salesian meditation is a kataphatic process, deliberately engaging the imagination.

Salesian Method of Meditation

First I am going to offer an outline of the Salesian method of meditation. Then I will explore certain elements of this method, with the hope of highlighting some of what I see at play in this meditative method.

Francis de Sales (1567―1622) was a Roman Catholic bishop and spiritual director who “was not overly concerned for the etiquette of piety, but in offering a way for souls to find union with God” [2] and is best known for his book, Introduction to the Devout Life which was “written for laity and teaches a simple form of meditation known as the Salesian method [which] is sometimes taught in the Episcopal Church as the way to meditate.” [3]

When broken down into five (5) steps, the Salesian method of meditation may be summarized as follows:

  1. Preparation
    • Place yourself in the presence of God.
    • Pray for assistance.
    • Compose the place (i.e. imagine a scene from the life of Jesus).
  2. Considerations: identify those images in the scene that affect you.
  3. Affections and Resolutions: convert feelings into understanding and then resolutions (acts of the will).
  4. Conclusion
    • Thanksgiving.
    • Oblation or offering of the results of the meditation.
    • Petition to fulfill in your life this day its insights.
    • The Spiritual Nosegay: that which we carry through the day from the meditation.
  5. The “spiritual nosegay,” which is a distinctive mark of Salesian meditation, is a clue to Francis de Sales’ spirituality. A nosegay is a little bunch of sweet-smelling flowers that ladies and gentlemen of the period carried with them when they went outdoors, so they could travel without being overcome by the stench of the open sewers that commonly ran along the streets of European cities. [4]

I invite you to spend a few minutes walking through each of these five steps ― imagine how you might engage this process. How do you enter the state? To what end? What might be among the (beneficial) outcomes? What might this meditative process look like? Feel like? How might we more fully engage our senses? (And ought we?) Do you imagine any benefits may derive from such a practice?

Transformative Flow of the Salesian Meditation

Before going into greater detail, I wish to direct your attention to the broad outline of the transformative flow taking place within the Salesian meditation:

  1. Preparation: Visual Imagery (Anchor/Trigger)
  2. Considerations: Emotional Upwelling (Response from our Unconscious)
  3. Affections and Resolutions: Rational-Thinking (Formulating a Plan of Action/Exertion of Will)
  4. Affections and Resolutions: Action-Behavioral Modification (Adoption of New Behavior/Overlaying Old Behavior)

A similar pattern is repeated, in condensed form, throughout the Conclusion:

  1. Thanksgiving: Emotional Upwelling
  2. Oblation: Emotional Upwelling
  3. Petition: Rational-Thinking
  4. Petition: Action-Behavioral Modification
  5. Spiritual Nosegay: Emotional Nosegay & Behavioral Modification

Thus, we are engaging a specific physical and mental state through imaginal entry into a visual scene (other modalities could be used, but most of us are highly visual, so it is a very good general approach to ushering us into the desired, impressionable state).

One inside this imaginal scene, we seek an emotional response, upwelling from our unconscious. Once we have had this experience, we seek to engage our analytical process to ascertain a moral lesson which may be derived from the emotionally charged scene. While in this emotionally charged state, we imagine applying the moral lesson in our own lives. We commit to doing so, setting our will upon doing so.

We then carry a “spiritual nosegay” with us throughout our day, in an attempt to maintain this disposition; a reminder and aromatic trigger (metaphorically speaking) of our desired behavior change.

Entering the Salesian Meditation

Preparation

Preparation begins by adopting a mental attitude or state which will be conducive to our entering into a meditative state. I specifically read this in the first two steps, of (1) placing ourselves in the presence of God; and (2) praying for assistance.

  • Place yourself in the presence of God.

I read this as occupying a physical space in which I have made it my habit to meditate. This may be a dedicated space, indoors or outdoors, although if outdoors the variation in weather and season must be taken into consideration when preparing the site.

I would also associate the specific anchoring of triggers [5] with my physical space which signal that I am about to intentionally enter a sacred space. Such items traditionally include icons, the lighting of candles, and the burning of incense. Gentle music, chimes, or sounds of nature may also be signaling triggers.

Some may find it helpful to ask the Holy Spirit to direct the prayer (Romans 8:26 NRSV “Likewise the Spirit helps us in our weakness; for we do not know how to pray as we ought, but that very Spirit intercedes [for us] with sighs too deep for words.”)

  • Pray for assistance.

Praying is the trigger that signals I am now operating within the sacred space. One of my first intentional acts is to cross myself (touching one’s fingers to the forehead, drawing a downward stroke to one’s solar plexus, and then from shoulder to shoulder, touching the heart at each passing).

As one may imagine, there are a host of possible triggers when praying: physical position, posture, attitude, adoption of specific verbal cadence (chanting, singing), and the specific texts employed, just to name a few. The more frequently one uses these specific anchors/triggers in one’s prayerful meditation, the more strongly they will become linked to the resulting physical, mental, and emotional state [6], thus proving increasingly effective over time.

  • Compose the place (i.e. imagine a scene from the life of Jesus).

Now that one has adopted the state one wishes to enter, one composes the object of one’s meditation. The example given is to imagine a scene from the life of Jesus; but any biblical scene may be employed, as may any church tradition which one finds suitably moving (perhaps an event from the life of a saint, for example).

Considerations

  • Identify those images in the scene that affect you.

We now enter into the scene we have created. The point is to live this as vividly as we may, to make the experience of the imagination as real as possible by smelling, hearing, touching, seeing, and tasting it. But do not overlook additional senses such as equilibrioception (sense of balance), proprioception (the perception of one’s body in space or the body’s position), or thermoception (sense of heat).

Having entered into the scene, we monitor our response to the scene in which we are immersed. We are seeking that which provokes in us a strong emotional reaction. These strong emotions, and that which induces them, we will carry into the next step.

Affections and Resolutions

  • Convert feelings into (1) understanding, and then into (2) resolutions (acts of the will).

(1) Understanding

I read the identification of the strong feeling, as a signal that something in my unconscious is responding to that element of the scene. And because it is my belief that the unconscious is one of the best avenues for the sacred More (Divine; God; Immanent aspect of the Transcendent) to flow into my awareness and experience, I am especially interested in accessing these unconscious objects as directly as I may.

Thus, as the emotion is triggered from within me, I note that with which I associate the emotion, or that which triggered the rising of the emotion. Once I have that scene, event, symbol, or whatever it may be, before my mind’s eye, I evaluate it: what is it? what is it trying to tell me, or show me?

Where this may begin as an unknown, as I inspect it (imagining my senses all reaching out to it, grasping it, listening to it, smelling it, tasting it, watching for any changes) I am awaiting some depth of understanding or apprehension to come to mind. At some point my interaction with this imaginal object (be that “object” of the imagination a person, symbol, experience, etc), it will give rise to some form of understanding or apprehension.

(2) Resolutions (acts of the will)

Once I have come to an understanding/apprehension prompted by the meditative scene, I am to make a resolution. The point of this meditation is to identify an act that I may carry out in my normal waking life. Many scenes from the life of Jesus may call me to show greater compassion to others, for example, or to take real steps to correct an injustice taking place in my community (be that in the church or city council).

Other scenes may call me to begin an internal transformation of character (to be more forgiving, less quick to anger, more generous, etc). Transformation of both self and community are part and parcel of the authentic Christian spiritual experience. Both are important, and one supports the other.

Conclusion

Our meditation concludes by offering thanks, both generally to the Transcendent More (God) and specifically for the fruit of the meditation, and by asking for the wherewithal to carry out our resolution.

  • Thanksgiving

This is the general offering of thanksgiving to the Transcendent More (God), in whatever way we apprehend that More. Praise and blessing are preferred responses to the sacred More; holding affection and joy in your heart for creation and creatures.

Psychologically, this is akin to positive reinforcement. We wish to exit our meditation with a positive and uplifting feeling. The meditation should become a form of nourishment for us. Adopting a state of positive appreciation affects us in this manner.

  • Oblation or offering of the results of the meditation.

This too is a form of thanksgiving. We thank the sacred More that has visited us with the gift of insight for the fruit of this meditation. We are blessed by the fruit of our meditation, and we offer as blessing those fruits we have been granted.

Psychologically, this establishes within us an environment of bounty and thankfulness. We are cultivating within ourselves this creative state of plenty, a cosmos built of and upon loving-kindness.

  • Petition to fulfill in your life this day its insights.

In our final petition to the sacred Transcendent More (God), we ask for the grace to stand by our resolution. We are fully invested and affirming that we will take positive steps to bring about our resolution (we are active), but we are also asking for the generous, compassionate support of the creative loving-kindness upon which/within which we are all swimming.

Spiritual Nosegay

  • The Spiritual Nosegay: that which we carry through the day from the meditation.

As a “little bunch of sweet-smelling flowers” or a perfumed handkerchief carried with us, provides around us a pleasing aroma wherever we travel, so too the fruits of our meditation ought to provide us with a sweet-smelling disposition toward the world and all persons  (this includes ourselves).

This may play a role in the process of theosis [7] ― we seek to carry with us throughout our day, a sweet-smelling spiritual nosegay, to refresh us, to inspire us, to help us dwell in our experience of our mediation all day. Where the mind dwells the body will follow. If we wish to transform into more compassionate, loving persons, therein our thoughts must reside.

Sidebar: While Roger Ray only briefly mentions Salesian meditation, for those interested in reading a simple, down to earth introduction to the basic stages of spirituality, from a Christian perspective, I recommend Ray’s short book, “Christian Wisdom for Today: Three Classic Stages of Spirituality” (St. Louis, MO: Chalice Press, 1999).

May God be gracious to us, and bless us, and make his face to shine upon us.
― Ps. 67:1

Erik+

Footnotes:

[1] APPERCEPTION:

  • Merriam-Webster On-line:
    1. : introspective self-consciousness
    2. : mental perception; especially : the process of understanding something perceived in terms of previous experience
  • Wikipedia On-line: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apperception
    • Apperception (from the Latin ad-, “to, toward” and percipere, “to perceive, gain, secure, learn, or feel”) is any of several aspects of perception and consciousness in such fields as psychology, philosophy and epistemology.

[2] Holmes III, Urban T.: “A History of Christian Spirituality: An Analytical Introduction” (Harrisburg, PA: Morehouse Publishing, 2002) page 105.

[3] Holmes, pg. 106.

[4] Holmes, pg. 106.

[5] anchoring of triggers, Neuro-linguistic programming (NLP): “The process of associating an internal response with some external trigger (similar to classical conditioning) so that the response may be quickly, and sometimes covertly, reaccessed” (http://purenlp.com/textonly/glossry2.htm#anchor). We all have developed a multitude of triggers, some we intentionally establish, but most are unconsciously established. One of the practical benefits of utilizing NLP is to reprogram unconscious behavior, so we behave as we consciously choose, not as we unconsciously react. To persons interested in learning more about NLP, I commend “Frogs into Princes” by Bandler and Grinder (see below).

[6] state, Neuro-linguistic programming (NLP): “The total ongoing mental and physical conditions from which a person is acting” (http://purenlp.com/textonly/glossry2.htm#State).

[7] Theosis, “(‘deification,’ ‘divinization’) is the process of a worshiper becoming free of hamartía (‘missing the mark’), being united with God…” (Orthodoxwiki, on-line: http://orthodoxwiki.org/Theosis). I see this as the intentional process of trying to live our lives as if we were channels for the Christ to flow through us, into the world. I suspect this is a goal few will achieve; yet we are the better for striving for it. This is one of the most important reasons I take part in the sacrament of the Eucharist (Holy Communion).

On-line Resources:

Francis de Sales:

“Meditation and Contemplation – What is the Difference?” (Carmelite Sisters, on-line) http://www.carmelitesistersocd.com/2013/meditation-contemplation/

“Christian Meditation” (Wikipedia, on-line) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christian_meditation

“Christian Contemplation” (Wikipedia, on-line) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christian_contemplation

“The Cloud of Unknowing” (written by an anonymous author of the 14th century; widely available from many publishers; Christian Classics Ethereal Library: on-line, text or PDF) http://www.ccel.org/ccel/anonymous2/cloud.html.

“Linguistics” (Wikipedia, on-line) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linguistics

“Neurolinguistics” (Wikipedia, on-line) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neurolinguistics

“Neuro-linguistic programming (NLP)”

Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy: Mysticism (on-line) http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/mysticism/

Theosis (Orthodoxwiki, on-line) http://orthodoxwiki.org/Theosis

Books:

“Christian Wisdom for Today: Three Classic Stages of Spirituality” (St. Louis, MO: Chalice Press, 1999) Roger L. Ray.

“The Cloud of Unknowing” (written by an anonymous author of the 14th century; widely available from many publishers).

“Frogs into Princes: Neuro Linguistic Programming” (Real People Press, 1979) by Richard Bandler and John Grinder.

“A History of Christian Spirituality: An Analytical Introduction” (Harrisburg, PA: Morehouse Publishing, 2002) Urban T. Holmes, III.

Transformational Christianity & Liturgical Address of Sept. 2014

Expansion by Paige Bradley (New York)

Expansion by Paige Bradley (New York)

What do I mean by Transformational Christianity?

I view Transformational Christianity as a deliberate, mindful, and active process of spiritual formation.  Spiritual formation itself presents a large stage, upon which there are many players, not all of whom are Christian.  All enduring religions speak to matters of spiritual formation, and in each case there are usually at least two key areas of work in which this formation takes place:

  1. Spiritual changes internal to oneself.
  2. Changes which take place within the community one lives.

One might note there are examples of persons retreating from society, seeking isolation, when undertaking deep spiritual formation.  In many cases, such individuals do later provide feedback to their society, or form communities in general isolation from the larger population.  The Desert Fathers and the formation of monasteries serve as Christian examples (there are parallels to be found in Hinduism, Buddhism, and Judaism, among others).

In some cases, we might observe a third key designation, which applies to those living outside of one’s community.  When seen from within young spiritual paradigms those who live outside one’s own community are seen as “Other” and in cases of extreme spiritual immaturity, even as sub-human.  (The late Ron Miller identifies this as living in the basement of consciousness.)

In contrast, when seen from within spiritually mature paradigms, the category of *Other* dissolves, and all persons are understood to share their humanity with one another.  The most highly refined spiritual paradigms see that all life is an expression of the One ―however that may be understood― in which, and from which, we are all rooted.  (The late Ron Miller identifies this as living in the rooftop garden of consciousness;  same talk as linked to in the previous paragraph.)

Thus, Transformational Christianity is a subset of the larger category of spiritual formation.

Proponents of Transformational Christianity employ the lens of Christianity to inform their spiritual formation.  And Jesus is the primary example of how we may best live our lives, serving as guide to both our interactions with others, and as the model for how we are to conduct our internal spiritual life.

By using the word “transformation” we are identifying our spiritual formation as an active process through which we seek to transform, or change, from one state to another.  This implies the transformation (changing) of oneself from one state, to another state, which we identify as being more spiritually refined.

Proponents of Transformational Christianity also recognise the need to sponsor transformation within our community.  This process simultaneously takes place within oneself and within the community in which one lives.  To a degree this happens automatically, because we each produce an effect upon the environment and community in which we live.  As we change, we also affect others.

There is also a degree of positive feedback, through which we are affected by the environment and community in which we live.  By means of this mutual feedback, both the individual and the community are influenced, and influence one another.  Thus, Transformational Christianity forms a symbiotic relationship between the individual and the community in which they live.  To the degree we are mindful of this dual process, we may better direct these influences favourably.

Several key points follow from these observations:

  •      Transformational Christianity is a process-driven model of spirituality.  This means there is more to it than simply affirming one’s belief.  It requires action.  Some may read this as the dirty word “works” which they read in stark contrast to “believing” in Jesus.  In my view this stems from a mis-reading of what constitutes “faith.”  In its older meanings, faith is active, and it was assumed to convey action within its very nature.  This is why faith without works is dead (James 2:14ff).  I would suggest one consider “belief” and “faith” from this perspective.  One is what one does, not what one only believes.  (One may also wish to watch Ron Miller’s presentation on James, “A Very Different Christian Story.”)
  •      Transformational Christianity is a “team sport.”  It does require community.  In its ultimate expression, in fact, it requires that the entire world become one’s community.  This however, is overwhelming, so it is important to focus one’s attention and energies upon a community with which one can directly interact.  In my opinion, this transformational understanding of community is best affected in those persons in whose eyes you can look.
  •      Think Globally, Act Locally is how the once-popular bumper sticker phrased this concept.  It is important to guide our choices with a mind toward our global impact.  We are all one.  We certainly all live on a single planet, and it is about time we lived our lives with this in mind.  At the same time, our actions are similar to other forms of energy.  Like heat, light, or radio waves, our action’s energy dissipates with distance.  This is why our ability to affect those persons in whose eyes we can look is greater than those persons living on the other side of the planet.
  •      When feeling stymied, just do something!  By yourself you are not going to change the world overnight.  But you can immediately begin your own internal transformation of thought.  Changing one’s thoughts promotes changes in behaviour.  And once you start looking for the opportunity, you can very quickly find some meaningful way to help another person.  When we all pull together, helping others in our individually small ways, the overall results are quite large.  And perhaps more importantly, the individual you help will be positively affected.

 

Liturgical Addresses

In September 2014, I offered several short liturgical addresses.  I intended some of these remarks to direct one’s thoughts toward what I think of as Transformational Christianity, because I believe the process of spiritual formation is one of the practical goals of Christianity.  I also appreciate that Transformational Christianity plainly acknowledges the importance of personal spiritual transformation, in parallel with transformation of community.

The service took place at the Community Christian Church, which is a progressive non-denominational Protestant church located in Springfield, Missouri (http://www.spfccc.org/).  I have retained the original section titles used during the worship service.  I have however, expanded upon the liturgical addresses.  If all goes well, those remarks actually delivered during the service should display in bold letters.

 

Wisdom Reading

(The purpose of the Wisdom Reading is to introduce the subject of the main sermon.  Thus, if commentary is offered, it should foreshadow the subject matter of the sermon to follow.)  

Romans is a letter Paul wrote to the Christians living in Rome.  A few of the more salient points to keep in the back of one’s mind when reading Paul’s letter to the Romans are:

Paul did not establish this church.  In fact, Paul had never even been to Rome.
Therefore, Paul is writing his own letter of introduction.
Paul is attempting to defuse negative impressions of his ministry in the East.
Paul wishes to secure funds for future ministry missions as far West as Gaul (Spain).
While Paul can display a very sharp tongue, in this letter he intends his best behaviour.

An additional point that should be remarked upon is the claim that Paul’s letter to the Romans is his attempt to fully lay out his thoughts on God, Jesus, his understanding of Christ, and how these relate to the church (which is often an anachronistic reading).  Attempting to do this is called systematic theology.  But this is not what Paul attempts to do in his letter to Rome.  If Paul ever wrote such a document, it has not survived.

I personally consider Romans to be another “letter of occasion.”  This simply means Paul wrote all his letters in response to a specific occasion.  Topics which would not be pertinent to the topic (occasion) being addressed, ought not be expected to be addressed by Paul.  And we certainly have no reason to think he told us everything he considered important.

What is different about Paul’s letter to Rome, is that he did not establish this community.  In all the other authentic letters of Paul, he is writing to communities which he founded, and as such, he assumed the role of “father” to that community.  And in the ancient world, a degree of authority ―in some cases a great deal of authority― was granted to the “father” of a given community.  And there are letters in which Paul does play to this role of “father” to the community.  But this is not the case in Paul’s letter to the Christians in Rome.

The overwhelming majority of biblical scholars believe there are several authors of Paul’s letters in the New Testament.  In addition to the authentic Paul, there is the author of the Pastoral Letters (1 & 2 Timothy & Titus), and possibly the author(s) of the the contested letters (Colossians, Ephesians, 2nd Thessalonians).  And no credible scholar any longer believes Paul write Hebrews.

The primary reason this is important to me, is that the hurtful things “Paul” is supposed to have said of women are forgeries!  If you are a woman, or there are women in your life you care deeply about, this is a very important discovery!

Once this barrier was out of the way, I was open to discovering Paul, the Jewish Mystic.  And that is the Paul I find so inspirational.  In the 14th chapter of Romans we catch only a glimpse of the mystical Paul.  In verses 7-9, Paul essentially reminds us that “as we are born from God, we also die into God.”

This, by the way, is the response I remember Marcus Borg offering during an interview, when asked how one might respond to someone on their death bed, should they ask of God and the afterlife.  To date, this remains the single best piece of advice I have yet heard on that question.  I find Borg’s observation beautifully eloquent.  It reminds us that we are born from a realm beyond this world, and assures us that into that realm or state of existence we shall return upon our death.  And it allows one to understand what this means in one’s own terms.  In the context of a hospital or hospice visitation, I find it to be a brilliant, caring, hopeful response.

The other person being interviewed ―a former hospital chaplain― held the opinion that the only proper response is to attempt to force a dying person to accept his (the chaplain’s) theology.  Namely, the person dying had to acknowledge belief in Jesus Christ, and a very literal interpretation of the resurrection account, or burn in hell.

The differences in these views, are similar to what I imagine may have been taking place in Rome, some 2,000 years ago.  One point of view is taking a very hard line on what is the proper and improper understanding of Christianity, and they are belittling or brow-beating those who do not agree with them.

We may ascertain that some Jewish-Christian members of the community were having difficulty in laying aside concerns over ritual purity;  I suspect the reference to meat carries a similar concern as addressed in the 8th chapter of 1 Corinthians;  we may further presume, that other Christians were demeaning these Jewish-Christians for their “weak faith” or “weak conviction” (in this passage the Greek word *pistei* may be translated as “faith” or “conviction;”  possible alternates would include “trust” or “confidence”).

I am given the impression some were mocking these Jewish-Christians, as being in some way lesser Christians for not being able to give up what Paul considered to be superstitions, or to transcend the cultural mythology in which they had been raised.  We find these same judgements being made today.

In the face of such abuse, Paul suggests that we must refrain from judging one another.  This is in fact, the main point of the first half the 14th chapter of Romans.  Learning to effectively, and meaningfully, relate to persons who occupy a stage of faith development which is much younger than our own presents a real challenge.  Yet, we must find a way to speak with persons occupying other stages of faith, without judging them.

Paul suggests that we sincerely follow our beliefs, and extend grace to those who are following their own sincere beliefs.  The small details of our behaviour ―do we eat meat?  which days are holy?― in the final analysis, these are really of very little importance.

What is of critical importance, however, is that we sincerely honour God, in whatever way we understand that observance.  And, that we allow others the same freedom!

Implicit to Paul’s argument is that we honour and respect others, even when their religious practice is not our own.  Paul, of course, meant this only in the context of the developing forms of early Christianity;  I would argue, this is better understood and practised as a general rule governing our behaviour and interactions with persons of all faiths.

     Today’s Wisdom Reading is from Paul’s letter to the Christians in Rome.
 
     Paul has become one of my favourite authors.  Once, that is, I learned there are several Paul’s, and that the hurtful things said of women were forgeries.
 
     This opened me to Paul the Jewish Mystic, and Paul who so passionately speaks of putting on the mind of Christ, and of learning to live our lives in imitation of Christ.
 
     This is the Paul I find inspirational.
 
     There is a hint of this mystical Paul in today’s reading, when we are reminded in so many words…
 
               …as we are born from God, we also die into God.
 
     But Paul also has a very practical, down-to-earth side.  Throughout this passage, Paul speaks to the very practical matter of NOT judging one another.  Some Jewish-Christians were having difficulty in laying aside concerns over ritual purity.
 
     Other Christians were demeaning them for their “weak faith” or conviction…  as if they were somehow lesser Christians for not being able to give up superstitions, or to transcend the cultural mythology in which they had been raised.
 
     But Paul tells us NOT to judge others.
 
     We are to sincerely follow our beliefs, and we are to be gracious, to those who are following their own sincere beliefs.
 
     The small details of how we act out
     – whether we eat meat, or which days we consider holy –
     these are of little, real importance.
 
     What is of critical importance, is that we sincerely honour God,
     in whatever way we understand that observance,
     and allow others the same freedom.

 

Romans 14:1-10(a)

Do Not Judge Another

1 Welcome those who are weak in faith [or “conviction”], but not for the purpose of quarrelling over opinions.  2 Some believe in eating anything, while the weak eat only vegetables.  3 Those who eat must not despise those who abstain, and those who abstain must not pass judgement on those who eat; for God has welcomed them.  4 Who are you to pass judgement on servants of another?  It is before their own lord that they stand or fall.  And they will be upheld, for the Lord [other ancient authorities read “for God”] is able to make them stand.

5 Some judge one day to be better than another, while others judge all days to be alike.  Let all be fully convinced in their own minds.  6 Those who observe the day, observe it in honour of the Lord.  Also those who eat, eat in honour of the Lord, since they give thanks to God;  while those who abstain, abstain in honour of the Lord and give thanks to God.

7 We do not live to ourselves, and we do not die to ourselves.  8 If we live, we live to the Lord, and if we die, we die to the Lord;  so then, whether we live or whether we die, we are the Lord’s.  9 For to this end Christ died and lived again, so that he might be Lord of both the dead and the living.

10 Why do you pass judgement on your brother or sister?  Or you, why do you despise your brother or sister?

(This is the YouTube presentation of the main sermon, given by Rev. Dr. Roger Ray.)

 

 

Offertory Sentence

(The Offertory Sentence is a brief affirmative statement one makes with regard to one’s attraction to the church and/or faith community.)

This small church helps feed persons every week at a local food kitchen, bringing food for that meal and providing volunteers to serve those who are hungry.  Volunteers also perform a variety of chores at a local food warehouse which distributes food directly to needy families.  Helping one’s neighbour does not get much more basic than this!

Members also solicit, collect, and then send shoes to needy children in Nicaragua.  I had not been aware children needed shoes in Nicaragua, but if kids run around barefoot, they naturally cut their feet, and these cuts easily become infected in their jungle environment.  Given there is little access to basic health care, these cuts may become so badly infected that amputations are required to save the child’s life.

These are the primary ways this church seeks to serve needy persons in their local community, and in a specific community in another country.  And, I must say, I find these efforts quite heart-warming.

The point of departure I chose for my Offertory Sentence is once again based upon a remark I once heard Marcus Borg make.  He offered the opinion that Christianity is transformational, and that this effect may be further divided into two different areas of our lives:

Transformation of Self
Transformation of Community

I find there is a lot of value in this perspective.  Transformation of self and of community are certainly related, but they are also different in many ways.  Transformation of self, is primarily an inward-looking practice.  Transformation of community requires becoming involve with other persons, and can only be accomplished through interaction with others.

     For me, Christianity is about Transformation.
     Transformation of Self.
     Transformation of Community.
     I believe these to be symbiotic relationships.
     
     Transformation of Self can be very inward-looking.
     Introspective. Mysterious. Elusive.
     
     In a great many ways, I feel it is beyond words.
     So how do we talk about it?
     
     With awkward, stumbling attempts, I suspect.
     But talk about it we should.
     Regularly.
     
     But Transformation of Self, is also found in experiences.
     And Transformation of Community, must be a result of shared experiences.
     Transformation of Community, we “talk about” by doing.
     
     My attraction to this church, is your Commitment to Community.
     I see this in the sharing of food at Bill’s Place and at Crosslines.
     I see this in the collection of shoes for needy children.
     
     What has attracted me to this church?
     It’s the opportunity, to do something, for someone else.

 

 

Invitation to Communion

(Communion, is also known as Holy Communion, The Lord’s Supper, and the Eucharist.  The observance of Communion dates to the earliest churches of the 1st century.  This is the formal reception of bread and wine which symbolize the body and blood of Jesus.  While this is a central practice of many Christians, specifically how it is understood and enacted varies widely.)

     I think most of us stand at one margin of society or another.  
     I suspect most people here are “recovering Catholics” or “recovering Protestants.”  
     Or “recovering something-elses.”
     
     I suspect many of us are the “church people” no church wanted!  
     Trouble makers.  Broken toys, exiled to the “Island of Misfit Toys.”  
     Or maybe… just thrown away.  
     
     I suspect many of us, come here by way of pain, neglect, or abuse.
     But I hope we also come here to mend, and to heal.
     And I hope, we come here to offer mending and healing to others.  
     
     This Open Communion is symbolic of this desire for healing.
     In ourselves. In our loved ones. In strangers.
     In those who may become friends.
     
     This Communion is also an open invitation to share in our community.
     Even if this is your first visit.
     Even, if this is your only visit.
     
     And I hope, those we meet at Bill’s Place or Crosslines also feel part of this community.
     
     Sharing Communion always turns my thoughts toward Jesus.
     
     Jesus asked, that we love God with all that we are.
     Jesus asked, that we love others, as we wish to be loved.
     
     Jesus shows us, how to help those living at the margins of society.
     Shows us, that the Kingdom of God is at hand.
     Shows, in fact, that how we treat others, reveals the Kingdom within ourselves.
     
     This is what I hear in the Transformational words of Jesus…
     
     “Do this, in remembrance of me.”

 

May the Lord bless and keep you.
Erik+

 

References:

 

Marcus J. Borg

http://www.marcusjborg.com/

 

Community Christian Church

http://www.spfccc.org/

 

Community Christian Church YouTube Home Page

https://www.youtube.com/user/CCCSpringfield

 

Community Christian Church, Sermon for Sept. 14, 2014

http://youtu.be/0BF8YhqnHWA?list=UUeF1t9dro_UwXa5qO_FH7bg

 

Bill’s Place

http://www.thekitcheninc.org/bills_place.php

 

Crosslines Food Pantry

http://crosslines.org/

 

Overview of Holy Communion / Lord’s Supper / Eucharist

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eucharist

 

Putting on the Mind of Christ

http://thepracticingcatholic.com/2011/09/22/putting-on-the-mind-of-christ/

 

The Mind of Christ

http://www.raystedman.org/new-testament/1-corinthians/the-mind-of-christ

 

Ron Miller’s Presentations to the Theosophical Society

http://www.ronmillersworld.org/updates/eight-talks-from-the-theosophical-society/

 

Ron Miller on Pluralism:

http://www.ronmillersworld.org/watch/guess-whos-coming-to-dinner-the-new-pluralism/

 

Ron Miller on the Letter of James

http://www.ronmillersworld.org/watch/a-very-different-christian-story/